All You Need to Know About the Phases of Alzheimer’s Disease

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Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive medical condition that gradually worsens with age. Older adults with this health issue often go through several distinctive stages and display unique symptoms. Learning about the different stages of Alzheimer’s disease can help you better understand your aging loved one’s behavior. Here’s what you need to know about the stages of Alzheimer’s disease.

The Onset of Alzheimer’s Disease

When your loved one is in the first phase of Alzheimer’s disease, there may be no noticeable symptoms. Proteins will begin clumping in the brain, but they may not yet impair the nerves. At this point, your loved one can still work, live alone, and remain independent. The preliminary stage can last for decades without any visible symptoms.

If your senior loved one has been diagnosed with a serious condition and needs help with tasks like meal prep, transportation, bathing, and grooming, reach out to Home Care Assistance, a leading provider of home care Pembroke Pines, FL, families can trust. We also offer comprehensive care for seniors with dementia, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s.

The Early Stage

During the early stage, the first symptoms start to become noticeable. Early-stage Alzheimer’s most often begins around the age of 65, and its symptoms include mild issues like forgetfulness or difficulty following multistep tasks. Your loved one might call a person by the wrong name, get lost on a familiar route, or misplace an important object.

The Middle Stage

Alzheimer’s disease is typically diagnosed during the middle stage. Your loved one may develop personality changes, find it difficult to respond with appropriate emotions in situations, frequently forget things, or get confused about his or her current location. Your parent might also need assistance with things like managing bills, running errands, or taking care of the home. Toward the later part of the middle stage, your loved one might not be able to live independently anymore.

Living independently is important for seniors who want to maintain a high quality of life. For some, this simply means receiving help with tasks that have become more challenging to manage over time. Even when families have the best intentions, they may not have the time to provide the care their elderly loved ones need and deserve. If your loved one needs help for a few hours a day or a few days a week, reach out to Home Care Assistance, a trusted provider of respite care Pembroke Pines seniors can depend on.

The Late Stage

By the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease, your loved one’s memory may no longer function correctly. He or she might find it difficult to recall recent events or think logically. Seniors in late-stage Alzheimer’s often have difficulty managing even the basics of personal care, such as showering and getting dressed. Being left alone may result in unsafe actions like drinking cleaning fluids or wandering into a busy road.

The Final Stage

The final stage tends to last about a year. Speech capabilities may decrease until there are a few words your loved one recognizes. Gradually, your parent may be unable to eat, move, or hold up his or her head. Many seniors end up with contracting muscles that result in rigidity and painful spasms. Because they may become entirely immobile, seniors in the final stage of Alzheimer’s often need around-the-clock care.

Older adults with Alzheimer’s disease can benefit from professional in-home care. If your senior loved one needs help managing an illness or assistance with daily tasks, make sure you choose a top-rated provider of senior home care. Pembroke Pines Home Care Assistance is here to help your loved one live a happier and healthier life in the golden years. From the mentally stimulating activities in our Cognitive Therapeutics Method to our friendly Care Managers who are available to answer your questions 24 hours a day, we offer a wide array of high-quality at-home care services. To create a customized in-home care plan for your aging parent, give us a call at (954) 374-8273 today.